DNA vaccines: A safe and efficient platform technology for responding to emerging infectious diseases

 Abstract

Traditionally vaccines are based on immunogens delivered as attenuated live microbes, inactivated pathogens, purified proteins, or virus-like particles.  Newer generation vaccines are based on the delivery of genes encoding for a protein antigen that can be transcribed and translated by host cells.  Despite current challenges to improve delivery and immunogenicity, DNA vaccination has several major advantages over traditional vaccines or over other types of investigational vaccine platforms.  DNA vaccines do not integrate into the host genome, they are stable, can be manufactured with relative ease and efficiency, have been safe in clinical trials, and do not require a preservative in final preparation.  The lack of vector-specific immunity allows the potential for DNA vaccines to be used as a platform technology for emerging viral diseases by allowing the simple exchange of genes encoding vaccine antigens in a stable plasmid backbone.

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DNA vaccines: A safe and efficient platform technology for responding to emerging infectious diseases