Immunogenicity and safety of three 2010–2011 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in Chinese toddlers, children and older adults: A double-blind and randomized trial

 Abstract

The 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic strain was for the first time included in the 2010–2011 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial in Chinese population to assess the immunogenicity and safety of the 2010–2011 TIV manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and compared it with the counterpart vaccines manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur and Sinovac Biotech. Healthy toddlers (6–36 mo), children (6–12 y) and older adults (≥60 y) with 300 participants in each age group were enrolled to randomly receive two doses (toddlers, 28 d apart) or one dose (children and older adults). The immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay. The solicited injection-site and systemic adverse events (AEs) were collected within 7 d after vaccination. All the three TIVs were well-tolerated with 15.1% of participants reporting AEs, most of which were mild. No serious AEs and unusual AEs were reported. Fever and pain were the most common systemic and injection-site AEs, respectively. The three TIVs showed good immunogenicity. The seroprotection rates against both H1N1 and H3N2 strains were more than 87% in toddlers after two doses and more than 95% in children and more than 86% in older adults after one dose. The seroprotection rates against B strain were 68–71% in toddlers after two doses, 70–74% in children and 69–72% in older adults after one dose. In conclusion, the three 2010–2011 TIVs had good immunogenicity and safety in Chinese toddlers, children and older adults and were generally comparable in immunogenicity and reactogenicity.

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Pages
1725 - 1734
doi
10.4161/hv.24832
Type
Research Paper
Group
Influenza
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Immunogenicity and safety of three 2010–2011 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in Chinese toddlers, children and older adults: A double-blind and randomized trial