Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines: Considerations for vaccination schedules and implications for developing countries

 Abstract

Prior to widespread vaccination, Haemophilus influenzae type b was a leading cause of severe childhood bacterial infection, including meningitis, worldwide. Over the last decade the world has taken great strides towards controlling Hib disease through routine use of conjugate vaccines in developed and developing countries. Currently there is no consensus on the appropriate schedule by which to use Hib vaccine. Vaccination schedules around the world vary greatly, particularly between high and low income countries. Questions remain as to the most effective and efficient schedule of primary doses, the need for a booster dose, and the implications of using combination vaccines. Here, we present a synthesis of data supporting various Hib vaccine schedules, with a focus on the implications for developing countries.

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Pages
810 - 818
doi
10.4161/hv.6.10.13017
Type
Review
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Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines: Considerations for vaccination schedules and implications for developing countries