Do pathogen-specific defense mechanisms contribute to wound-induced resistance in tomato?

 Abstract

A network of shared intermediates/components and/or common molecular outputs in biotic and abiotic stress signaling has long been known, but the possibility of effective influence between differently triggered stresses (co-protection) is less studied. Recent observations show that wounding induces transient protection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to four pathogens with a range of lifestyles, locally and systemically. The contribution of ethylene (ET) in basal but also in wound-induced resistance to each pathogen, although dispensable, is demonstrated to be positive (Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora capsici) or negative (Fusarium oxysporum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato). Furthermore, the expression of several defense markers is influenced locally and/or systemically by wounding and ET, and might be part of that core of conserved molecular responses whereby an abiotic stress such as wounding imparts co-resistance to biotic stress. In this addendum, we speculate on some of the physiological responses to wounding that might contribute to the modulation of resistance in a more pathogen-specific manner.

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Pages
340 - 341
doi
10.4161/psb.3.5.5351
Type
Article Addendum
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Do pathogen-specific defense mechanisms contribute to wound-induced resistance in tomato?