Neuronal Ca2+ dyshomeostasis in Huntington disease

 Abstract

The expansion of the N-terminal poly-glutamine tract of the huntingtin (Htt) protein is responsible for Huntington disease (HD). A large number of studies have explored the neuronal phenotype of HD, but the molecular aethiology of the disease is still very poorly understood. This has hampered the development of an appropriate therapeutical strategy to at least alleviate its symptoms. In this short review, we have focused our attention on the alteration of a specific cellular mechanism common to all HD models, either genetic or induced by treatment with 3-NPA, i.e. the cellular dyshomeostasis of Ca2+. We have highlighted the direct and indirect (i.e. transcriptionally mediated) effects of mutated Htt on the maintenance of the intracellular Ca2+ balance, the correct modulation of which is fundamental to cell survival and the disturbance of which plays a key role in the death of the cell.

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Pages
76 - 84
doi
10.4161/pri.23581
Type
Mini-Review
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Neuronal Ca2+ dyshomeostasis in Huntington disease