Working together and apart: The twisted relationship of the Mre11 complex and Chk2 in apoptosis and tumor suppression

 Abstract

Central to the DNA damage response (DDR) is the highly conserved Mre11 complex consisting of Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1. The Mre11 complex acts as a sensor of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulates the signal transduction cascades that are triggered following damage detection1. Rare human genetic instability syndromes such as Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) have underscored the importance of the DSB response in the suppression of tumorigenesis, as well as other severe pathologies affecting the development of both the immune system and the central nervous system. Using murine models of the human diseases, we have investigated the role of the Mre11 complex, and other modulators of the DSB response, in tumor suppression2, 3. We found that the checkpoint kinase Chk2 is crucial for the suppression of a diverse array of tumor types in Mre11 complex mutants and uncovered multiple roles for the Mre11 complex in apoptotic signaling in parallel to Chk24, 5.

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3618 - 3621
doi
10.4161/cc.7.23.7064
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Working together and apart: The twisted relationship of the Mre11 complex and Chk2 in apoptosis and tumor suppression