Shigella and Autophagy

 Abstract

Bacterial invasion of eukaryotic cells, and host recognition and elimination of the invading bacteria, determines the fate of bacterial infection. Once inside mammalian cells, many pathogenic bacteria enter the host cytosol to escape from the lytic compartment and gain a replicative niche. Recent studies indicate that autophagy also recognizes intracellular bacteria. Although autophagy is a conserved membrane trafficking pathway in eukaryotic cells that sequesters undesirable or recyclable cytoplasmic components or organelles and delivers them to lysosomes, autophagy has recently been described as playing a pivotal role as an intracellular surveillance system for recognition and eradication of the pathogens that have invaded the cytoplasm. Indeed, unless they are able to circumvent entrapping by autophagosomes, bacteria ultimately undergo degradation by delivery into autolysosomes. In this review we discuss recent discoveries regarding Shigella strategies for infecting mammalian cells, and then focus on recent studies of an elegant bacterial survival strategy against autophagic degradation.

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171 - 174
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Spotlight
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Shigella and Autophagy