Autophagy and the cytoskeleton: New links revealed by intracellular pathogens

 Abstract

Actin-based motility is used by various pathogens such as Listeria and Shigella for dissemination within cells
and tissues, yet host factors counteracting this process have not been identified. We have recently discovered that infected host cells can prevent actin-based motility of Shigella by compartmentalizing bacteria inside ‘septin cages,’ revealing a novel mechanism of host defense that restricts dissemination. Because bacterial proteins controlling actin-based motility also regulate the autophagy process, we hypothesized and then established a link between septin caging and autophagy. Together, these results unveiled the first cellular mechanism that counteracts pathogen dissemination. Understanding the role of septins, a so far poorly characterized component of the cytoskeleton, will thus provide new insights into bacterial infection and autophagy.

 Related Article:

A Zaltsman, A Krichevsky, A Loyter, V Citovsky. Agrobacterium induces expression of a host F-box protein required for tumorigenicity. Cell Host Microbe 2010; 7: 197- 209.
PMID: 21075354 DOI: 10.1016/j.chom.2010.

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Pages
780 - 782
doi
10.4161/auto.7.7.15593
Type
Autophagic Punctum
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Autophagy and the cytoskeleton: New links revealed by intracellular pathogens