• Effete, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with multiple roles in <em>Drosophila</em> development and chromatin organization
  • A simplified and efficient germline-specific CRISPR/Cas9 system for <em>Drosophila</em> genomic engineering
  • A strategy for generation and balancing of autosome: <i>Y</i> chromosome translocations

Effete, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with multiple roles in Drosophila development and chromatin organization

Francesca Cipressa and Giovanni Cenci

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 A simplified and efficient germline-specific CRISPR/Cas9 system for Drosophila genomic engineering

Zachary L Sebo, Han B Lee, Ying Peng and Yi Guo

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A strategy for generation and balancing of autosome: Y chromosome translocations

Sonal S Joshi, Han Cheong and Victoria H Meller

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Fly welcomes associate editors

Fly announces the appointment of two renowned Drosophila researchers as Associate Editors. Dr. Konrad Basler, a Professor and Director of the Institute of Life Sciences at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, is a leader in the field of cell signaling during development of Drosophila. He has made numerous important and far-reaching contributions in our understanding of the Wnt and other signaling pathways, while also advancing technological tools now used in many laboratories, such as the Flippase-based recombination system and the PhiC31 transgene integration system.

Dr. Matthew Wolf is an Associate Professor and Physician-Scientist at Duke University Medical Center. As a researcher with primary expertise in cardiology, he uses the Drosophila model system to study heart function and cardiomyopathies. He has employed various screening strategies to identify novel genes/mutations that contribute to normal/aberrant heart functions. As a cardiologist, he is expanding the findings made in Drosophila to mammalian models, such as mice, which in turn will result in a better understanding and treatment options of heart conditions in humans.

Current Issue

Fly

April/May/June 2014

Volume 8, Issue 2

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About the featured image
Immunostaining for SUMO (red) on squashed salivary gland wild-type polytene chromosomes. For more information, see Bocksberger et al.

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