• Filamin A and Big2: A shared endocytic pathway
  • The marriage of quantitative genetics and cell biology: A novel screening approach reveals people have genetically encoded variation in microtubule stability
  • Why does endocytosis in single cells care which side up?

Filamin A and Big2: A shared endocytic pathway

Volney L. Sheen

The marriage of quantitative genetics and cell biology: A novel screening approach reveals people have genetically encoded variation in microtubule stability

Dennis C Ko and Sarah L Jaslow

Why does endocytosis in single cells care which side up?

Kristine Schauer and Bruno Goud

Current Issue

BioArchitecture

March/April 2014

Volume 4, Issue 2

Still accepting content

View current issue

About the cover image
Fission yeast (Schizosaccaromyces pombe) cells triple-labeled in fluorescent red (actin filaments, rhodamine-phalloidin), green (myosin-V, Myo52p-3xGFP), and blue (nuclei, Hoechst stain). The overlap of red and green (yellow) reflects regions within cells where transport by Myo52p is directed toward actin cables by the actin filament-binding protein tropomyosin. Image graciously provided by Matthew Lord.

BioArchitecture has been accepted for inclusion in Medline/PubMed.


Recent Articles